Google+

Be A Scout!

BeAScout logo

Sea Scout Wiki

Quick Reference
 

scr barqueeagle app

Barque Eagle

SCT long cruise history

scr seal

 

Sea Scout Experience Advanced Leadership Training (SEAL)

The Sea Scout Experience Advanced Leadership (SEAL) training program is designed to teach leadership skills while underway. SEAL is designed to “jump start” the junior leaders of new Ships and to fine tune leaders of experienced Ships. It is a hard core, physically and mentally demanding, and remarkably rewarding hands-on leadership experience. New and experienced Sea Scouts can succeed at SEAL so long as they are willing to learn and work hard at preparation.

Download the SEAL Application 2015 here.

 

History and Purpose

In 1996, the National Sea Scouting Committee created a new youth leadership course called Sea Scout Advanced Leadership (SEAL) training. The course is designed to develop leadership skills in young adults. Seamanship is the medium through which the course is taught; however, nautical skills are the means, not the end. This course, which utilizes an “at sea” experience as a laboratory, is intended to teach and apply leadership skills. There are few other media offering the opportunity for young people to actually put leadership skills utilizing group dynamics into practice. In SEAL, there is no “play acting.” All situations and tasks are real, not created. Bad decisions or team failure can produce immediate and real problems.

 

Curriculum

This week long “at sea” experience allows the student to learn and apply new skills immediately. Courses consist of five to seven youth with a Course Skipper and two instructors. Each instructional module relates to a specific leadership skill with exercises designed to show mastery of the concepts taught while under the leadership of the Boatswain of the Day. SEAL is NOT a seamanship course. All applicants are expected to have basic seamanship skills prior to arrival.

Skills Taught

Evaluation Team Building Leadership
Training Communicating Goal Setting
Planning & Preparing Motivating Managing, Supervising & Commanding
Counseling Implementing & Re-Implementing Problem Solving

 

Preparing for SEAL

SEAL candidates must arrive at the course prepared to learn, lead, and excel. It is not a seamanship course and all candidates must become intimately familiar with the Safety & Seamanship chapter and appendix of the current Sea Scout Manual. Candidates will be required to outline the chapter in detail. Additionally, candidates must be able to perform basic coastal navigation on paper and must be able to tie all knots required for Apprentice Sea Scout and Ordinary Sea Scout ranks. They must know and understand the basic nomenclature of a sailing vessel; know and understand helm commands and points of relative bearings. All of this information is in the Sea Scout Manual.

 

Conducting the Training

This course is managed by the National Sea Scout Committee and have been conducted at Chesapeake Bay, the Texas Gulf Coast, the Pacific, the Ohio River Valley, Florida Keys, Long Island Sound, and the Great Lakes. Course dates vary but are always held in the summer months. Costs are typically from $125 to $250 not including candidate transportation to and from the course. Check our event calendar for course offerings.

 

Requirements

    • Achieve Ordinary Rank by June 1st the year of the course.
    • Apply leadership skills with their ship after the course.

Before Students Arrive

The student will:

  • Prepare an outline of “Chapter 4” of the Sea Scout Manual to be forwarded to the course’s Skipper for evaluation.
  • Know basic nomenclature of a sailing vessel.
  • Know and be able to perform basic coastal navigation.
  • Be able to tie all knots required for Apprentice and Ordinary Ranks in less than three minutes.
  • Know standard helm commands.

Two practice tests are sent to the applicant’s Skipper prior to the course that cover seamanship covered in “Chapter 4” of the Sea Scout Manual and basic coastal navigation. The student’s performance on these practice tests helps the student know better how to prepare for the course.

 

Goals

By the end of the course, graduates will be equipped with leadership skills and management tools necessary to fire up a ship’s program. They will be prepared to serve in leadership positions such as Boatswain or Boatswain’s Mate in their ships as well as in their schools, jobs, and communities.

 

Recognitions

Each graduate receives the coveted SEAL pin. SEAL patches are also available to graduates, which can be worn on their uniform instead of the pin. SEAL graduates are also selected to represent Sea Scouts with other opportunities such as trips on submarines, aircraft carriers, and as course marshals for the America’s Cup races.

 

Applications

Applications are due each year by March 1st, and are available for download here. All courses are posted, and the applicant must list their preference in priority order. If two or more Scouts from the same ship are applying, they should apply for different locations. Further questions should be directed to the National SEAL Training Coordinator, Mr. Jim Elroy here or by telephone at (805) 797-7900.

 

Preparing for SEAL

The Skipper’s evaluation of the candidate’s readiness for SEAL is critical. The application consists of an admonition and instructions to the Skipper regarding evaluation of the applicant. Preparation and full readiness regarding the knowledge of seamanship as set out in the Safety & Seamanship Chapter of the Sea Scout Manual and coastal piloting is absolutely essential prior to arrival at the training site. Failure to fully prepare ensures failure of this course and the waste of a valuable space for someone else that would have been able to participate.

 

To assist candidates' preparation, two tests are forwarded to their Skipper. The first tests the candidates knowledge on the Safety & Seamanship Chapter of the current Sea Scout Manual, the second tests their knowledge of basic coastal navigation. In the navigation test, candidates will set a course, compute speed, time and distance, compass error, a fix by two lines of position and finding latitude and longitude. These tests are used by the candidate and her Skipper to determine the candidate's readiness for SEAL. Using the results of the test, the Skipper can tell if the candidate needs help before she reports to SEAL training.

scr natlbosn app

scr natlflag app

How to Start a Ship

StuffforSeacouts

AdultResources

UpcomingEvents 

quarter-medQuartermaster

The highest award for Sea Scouts presents a challenge that, when met, will affect a young person lifelong. The Quartermaster candidate must think analytically about how the program is delivered and supported, while developing a deeper understanding of Scouting ideals. Most requirements represent intensification of what was learned for previous ranks, but with significant additions in the Quartermaster service project, cruise, and study of weather and forecasting. The cruise involves taking long-term command of a vessel and crew and conducting critical drills.

Requirements

  1. Ideals
    1. Initiate a discussion on the ideals stated in the Sea Promise.
    2. Prepare a written analysis, offering recommendations for improvements regarding one of the following ship’s programs: bylaws and code, training programs, ceremonies, quarterdeck meetings, recruiting programs, or fund-raising.
  2. Active Membership
    1. Attend at least 75 percent of your ship’s meetings and special activities for 18 months. Note: Check with your ship’s yeoman.
    2. Present a talk or program at least 15 minutes long on Sea Scouts to a service club, religious organization, PTA, or other adult organization.
  3. Leadership
    1. Quartermaster Project: While an Able Sea Scout, plan, develop, and demonstrate leadership to others in a service project that is helpful to any religious institution, school, or your community. The project plan must be approved by your Skipper and ship committee and approved by the council or district advancement committee before you start. This service project should involve your ship and at least one other group.
    2. Officer: Either serve as an elected officer for at least six months or serve as an activity chair for three major events (These events are in addition to the Able requirement.)
    3. Quartermaster Cruise: Take command of a vessel with a crew of not less than four Sea Scouts for at least 40 consecutive hours, including two nights.  You must delegate and supervise all duties. During the cruise complete the following: Inspect the vessel for required equipment; supervise all menu preparation; prepare the boat to get underway with a proper checklist approved by the adult leaders; anchor, dock, and maintain course by commands to the helmsman; remain underway for an extended period during darkness; and discuss appropriate nighttime running procedures. While underway, perform the following drills: man overboard, damage control, abandon ship, fire, collision, and any other drills used by your ship. During this cruise no substantial errors may be committed.
      or
      Successfully complete SEAL (Sea Scout Advanced Leadership) training.
  4. Swimming
    Either complete the requirements for BSA Lifeguard or complete a Red Cross lifesaving course or other certified lifesaving course.
  5. Safety
    1. Know the heavy-weather precautions taken aboard both power and sailing vessels when dangerous weather approaches, and demonstrate these precautions aboard the vessel used by your ship.
    2. Know the special precautions that should be taken when limited visibility is encountered.
    3. Draw the International Code flags and pennants from memory and give the single-letter meanings (Alpha = Have diver down, keep clear) of the flags.  Show how to use the book International Code of Signals.
  6. Marlinspike Seamanship
    1. Teach the Apprentice, Ordinary, and Able marlinspike seamanship requirements to a crew.
    2. Make an eye splice in double-braided line.
  7. Boat Handling
    1. Take charge of the craft used by your ship and give all commands to the crew for picking up a mooring buoy and properly mooring the vessel in several wind and current situations.
    2. Demonstrate and teach the principles of springing into and out from a dock, from both bow and stern, using an engine depending on the type of vessel used by your ship.
    3. Teach Ordinary and Able boat handling requirements to a crew.
  8. Anchoring
    1. Teach the Ordinary and Able anchoring requirements to a crew.
    2. Know the methods of bringing a vessel to anchor and a mooring with special emphasis on wind and current with respect to the vessel’s course and speed.
    3. Take charge of a vessel used by your ship and give all commands to the crew for setting and weighing anchor in several wind and current situations.
  9. Navigation Rules
    Teach the Ordinary navigation rules requirements to a crew.
  10. Piloting and Navigation
    1. Teach the Ordinary and Able piloting requirements to a crew.
    2. Know the methods of fixing a boat’s position in limited visibility.
  11. Weather
    1. Read and understand a local weather bulletin. Know how to obtain current marine and weather reports from the National Weather Service in your area by telephone, radio, or online.
    2. Demonstrate your ability to read a barometer, thermometer, anemometer, psychrometer, and weather vane. Be familiar with the Beaufort Wind Force Scale.
    3. Demonstrate your knowledge of the weather signs for your local area, including cloud types. Prepare a 48-hour forecast and compare your forecast with the actual weather that occurred.
  12. Environment
    1. Discuss the three types of marine sanitation devices and the laws governing sewage discharge.
    2. Explain what gray water is and how it should be handled in your boating area.
    3. Explain what aquatic nuisance species are and how you can help stop their spread.
    4. Write a 500-word report on an aquatic environment (freshwater, coastal, estuary, or sanctuary). Include in the report the location, habitat, history, animals and plants that inhabit the area, its importance to man, current regulations, and what boaters can do to help preserve it for future generations.
  13. Electives—Do any four of the following.
    1. Sailing: Know the principles of handling a schooner, ketch, yawl, or other suitable sailing vessel. Under competent direction, take charge of a crew and demonstrate your ability to handle a suitable sailing vessel in all points of sail.
    2. Engines:
      1. Explain the principal features of steam turbine, turboelectric, direct reversing diesel, diesel-electric, gas turbine, nuclear, gasoline, and diesel engines and the relative advantages of each type.
      2. Explain the operation of spark ignition and compression ignition for internal combustion engines used aboard small vessels.
      3. Demonstrate your familiarity with the engine aboard the vessel used by your ship, including its principles of operation, fuel, lubrication, cooling and electrical systems, and their component parts.
      4. Demonstrate your ability to locate and correct minor engine troubles according to the engine manufacturer’s troubleshooting guide.
    3. Vessel Maintenance: Take charge of reconditioning or overhauling at least one of your ship’s vessels, or take charge of hauling out the principal vessel used by your ship. In either case, lay out a plan of the work to be done in advance, including an estimate of the materials, tools, cost, and time involved.
    4. Electricity:
      1. Know and demonstrate the correct method of rescuing a person in contact with a live wire.
      2. Understand the construction of simple battery cells. Demonstrate the proper care of storage batteries.
      3. Explain the difference between direct current and alternating current and the best uses for each.
      4. Demonstrate that you know how to replace fuses, reset circuit breakers, and properly splice shipboard electric cable.
      5. Submit a diagram of the electrical system aboard the vessel used by your ship.
      6. Explain wire tables, the current-carrying capacity of circuits, and the hazards and prevention of electrical overloading.
      7. Explain electrolysis as applied to the deterioration of a boat’s underwater fittings by galvanic action and its prevention.
    5. Navigation:
      1. Explain how the sextant works. Show how to use it and demonstrate measuring horizontal angles and altitudes.
      2. Find latitude by the altitude of Polaris or by the sun’s altitude at local apparent noon. Demonstrate how longitude is determined.
      3. Demonstrate finding error in the boat’s compass by the sun’s azimuth.
    6. Drill: Demonstrate your ability to handle the ship’s company in close-order drill. Do all required maneuvers.
    7. Piloting: Under competent direction, assume the duties of navigator of your ship’s vessel. Plot its projected course between two ports at least two hours apart and cruise that course mooring to mooring handling all piloting duties.  The cruise should be made in daylight hours with good visibility.
    8. Yacht Racing Crew: Take charge of a crew in a race using current ISAF racing rules.
    9. Rigging: Demonstrate your ability to splice and handle wire rope, attach wire rope fittings, and complete a safety and tuning inspection of a ship vessel.
    10. USPS: As an apprentice member of the United States Power Squadrons complete the Advanced Piloting course.
    11. U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary: Join a local Coast Guard Auxiliary flotilla as a Basic Qualified member and qualify for any Operational Auxiliary Program (AUXOP) or Trident Marine Safety specialty rating.

Source:  Sea Scout Manual, 11th Edition, 2012 printing

sea scout-apprenticeApprentice

  1. Ideals
    1. Qualify as a member of your Sea Scout ship by taking part in the ship’s admission ceremony.
    2. Repeat from memory and discuss with an adult leader the Sea Promise.  Discuss the BSA Mission Statement, the BSA Vision Statement, the Scout Oath and Law and agree to carry out the provisions of your ship’s code and bylaws.
    3. Demonstrate acceptable courtesies used aboard a Sea Scout vessel.
    4. Demonstrate the proper procedure for boarding a Sea Scout vessel and landship.
  2. Active Membership
    1. Provide evidence that you are fulfilling your financial obligations to your ship, including helping with fund-raisers.
      Note: Check with your ship’s purser.
    2. Obtain the Sea Scout uniform. Describe the Sea Scout work and dress uniforms. Tell how and when the uniforms are worn and explain care of uniforms.
  3. Leadership
    1. Describe your ship’s organization, including the youth and adult leadership positions.
    2. Demonstrate your ability to identify officer and adult leader insignia. Explain the chain of command in your ship.
  4. Swimming
    1. Jump feetfirst into water over your head, swim 75 yards/meters in a strong manner using one or more of the following strokes: sidestroke, breaststroke, trudgen, or crawl; then swim 25 yards/meters using the elementary backstroke. The 100 yards/meters must be swum continuously and include at least one sharp turn. After completing the swim, rest by floating on your back, remaining as motionless as possible. (Refer to the BSA’s Swimming merit badge instruction if you need to improve your swimming strokes.)
    2. Discuss the BSA Safe Swim Defense plan and explain how it is used to protect Sea Scouts and other groups during swimming activities.
  5. Safety
    1. Explain the uses, advantages, and disadvantages of the five types of Coast Guard–approved life jackets. Demonstrate the proper use and care of life jackets used by your ship. 
    2. Identify visual day and night marine distress signals, and know their location and the proper use for your ship’s vessel(s).
    3. Use the Distress Communications Form to demonstrate the procedure to send the following VHF emergency messages: Mayday, Pan Pan, and Security.
    4. Know the safety rules that apply to vessels and equipment used by your ship, and safety standards in the use of power tools, machinery, lifting heavy objects, and other safety devices used by your ship.
  6. Marlinspike Seamanship
      Using both large and small lines, tie and explain the use of the following knots: overhand, square, figure eight, bowline, two half hitches, clove hitch, sheet bend, and cleat hitch.
  7. Boat Handling
    1. Demonstrate the ability to use a heaving line.
  8. Service
      Log at least 16 hours of work on ship equipment, projects, or activities other than regular ship meetings, parties, dances, or fun events.
        Note: Arrange for this work through the ship’s officers.
        Source:  Sea Scout Manual, 11th Edition, 2012 printing

sea scout-ordinaryOrdinary

  1. Ideals
    1. Explain the symbolism of the Sea Scout emblem.
    2. Give a brief oral history of the U.S. flag.
    3. Demonstrate how to fly, hoist, lower, fold, display and salute the U.S. flag. Explain flag etiquette and protocols for both land and sea.
  2. Active Membership
    1. Attend at least 75 percent of your ship’s meetings and activities for six months.
      Note: Check with your ship’s yeoman.
    2. Do one of the following. Recruit a new member for your ship and follow through until the new member is registered and formally admitted with an admissions ceremony, or assist in planning and carrying out a ship recruiting activity, such as an open house or joint activity with a youth group or organization (another Sea Scout ship will not count).
  3. Leadership
    1. Complete quarterdeck training, either as an officer or as a prospective officer.
    2. Serve as an activity chair for a major ship event. Responsibilities should include planning, directing, and evaluating the event.
  4. Swimming
    Pass all requirements for the BSA’s Swimming merit badge.
  5. Safety
    1. Discuss BSA Safety Afloat with an adult leader.
    2. Describe the safety equipment required by law for your ship’s primary vessel.
    3. Develop a ship’s station bill for your ship and review it with an adult leader.
    4. Plan and practice the following drills: man overboard, fire, and abandon ship.
    5. Describe three types of equipment used in marine communications.
    6. Demonstrate your knowledge of correct maritime communications procedures by making at least three calls to another vessel, marinas, bridges, or locks.
    7. Galley
      1. Before an activity, submit a menu that uses cooked and uncooked dishes, a list of provisions, and estimated costs for a day’s meal (breakfast, lunch, and dinner). Once the provision list is approved, help obtain the items on the list.
      2. Explain the use of charcoal, pressurized alcohol, and propane. Include safety precautions for each.
      3. Prepare breakfast, lunch, and dinner while on the activity. Demonstrate your ability to properly use the galley equipment or personal cooking gear generally used by your ship.
      4. Demonstrate appropriate sanitation techniques for food preparation and meal cleanup.
  6. Marlinspike Seamanship
    1. Name the various materials used to manufacture rope, the advantages and disadvantages of each, and the characteristics of laid and braided rope.  Discuss the meaning of lay, thread, strand, and hawser. Explain how rope is sized and measured.
    2. Using both large and small lines, tie and explain the use of the following knots: stevedore’s knot, French (double) bowline, bowline on a bight, timber hitch, rolling hitch, marline hitch, and midshipman’s (taut-line) hitch.
    3. Demonstrate your ability to secure a line to pilings, bitts, cleats, and rings, and to coil, flake, and flemish a line.
    4. Demonstrate how to cut and heat-seal a synthetic line and whip the end of plain-laid line using waxed cord or similar material.
  7. Boat Handling
    1. Name the principal parts of a typical sailboat and a runabout.
    2. Name the principal parts of the masts, booms, spars, standing and running rigging, and sails of a gaff- or Marconi-rigged sloop, schooner, and ketch or yawl.
    3. Describe the identifying characteristics of a sloop, ketch, yawl, cutter, and schooner.
    4. Demonstrate your ability to handle a rowboat by doing the following: row in a straight line for a quarter mile, stop, make a pivot turn, return to the starting point and backwater in a straight line for 50 yards/meters. Make a turn and return to the starting point.
  8. Anchoring
    1. Name the parts of a stock anchor and a stockless anchor.
    2. Describe five types of anchors. Describe how each type holds the bottom, the kind of bottom in which it holds best, and the advantages or disadvantages of each type.
    3. Calculate the amount of anchor rode necessary for your ship’s primary vessel in the following depths: 10, 20, and 30 feet in normal and storm conditions.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to set and weigh anchor.
  9. Navigation Rules
    1. Explain the purpose of Navigation Rules, International and Inland.
    2. Know the general “Rule of Responsibility.”
    3. Define stand-on and give-way vessels for the following situations: meeting, crossing, and overtaking for both power and sailing vessels.
    4. Explain “Responsibility Between Vessels” (vessel priority).
    5. Explain the navigation lights required for power-driven and sailing vessels underway. Explain what is required for a vessel under oars.
    6. Describe the sound signals for maneuvering, warning, and restricted visibility.
  10. 10. Piloting and Navigation
    1. Demonstrate your understanding of latitude and longitude. Using a Mercator chart, demonstrate that you can locate your position from given coordinates and determine the coordinates of at least five aids to navigation.
    2. Explain the degree system of compass direction. Explain variation and deviation and how they are used to convert between true headings and bearings to compass headings and bearings.
    3. Describe three kinds of devices used aboard ship for measuring speed and/or distance traveled and, if possible, demonstrate their use.
    4. Understand Universal Coordinated Time (Greenwich Mean Time or Zulu Time) and zone time. Demonstrate your ability to convert from one to the other for your local area.
    5. Explain the 24-hour time system and demonstrate that you can convert between 12- and 24-hour time.
    6. Make a dead reckoning table of compass and distances (minimum three legs) between two points, plot these on a chart, and determine the final position.
      Note: Ideally this requirement should be met while underway. If this is not possible, it may be simulated using charts.
  11. Practical Deck Seamanship
    1. Name the seven watches and explain bell time.
    2. Explain the duties of a lookout and demonstrate how to report objects in view and wind directions with respect to the vessel.
    3. Name relative bearings expressed in degrees.
    4. While underway, serve as a lookout for one watch.
    5. Demonstrate the use of wheel or helm commands found in the Sea Scout Manual.
    6. Supervise and contribute to the cruise log for three days of cruising (one cruise or a combination of day cruises). Submit the cruise logs to your Skipper.
  12. Environment
    Discuss with an adult leader the Federal Water Pollution Control Act as related to oil discharges. Explain what a “Discharge of Oil Prohibited” placard is and find it aboard your ship’s vessels.
  13. Cruising
    1. Plan and participate in an overnight cruise in an approved craft under leadership that lasts a minimum of 36 hours.
    2. While on the cruise, perform the duties of a helmsman for at least 30 minutes.
  14. Boating Safety Course
    Successfully complete a boating safety course approved by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators (NASBLA) offered by one of the following agencies: a state boating agency, the United States Power Squadrons, the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, or other private or military education courses.
  15. Service
    As an Apprentice, log at least 16 hours of work on ship equipment, projects, or activities other than regular ship meetings, parties, dances, or fun events.
    Note: Arrange for this work through the ship’s officers.
  16. Electives—Do any three of the following:
    1. Drill: Demonstrate your ability to execute commands in close-order drill.
    2. Yacht Racing: Describe the procedures used in yacht racing and the signals used by the race committee to start a race. Serve as a crew member in a race sailed under current International Sailing Federation Rules.
    3. Sailing: In a cat-rigged or similar small vessel, demonstrate your ability to sail single-handedly a triangular course (leeward, windward, and reaching marks).
      Demonstrate beating, reaching, and running. A qualified sailing instructor should observe this requirement.
    4. Ornamental Ropework: Make a three-strand Turk’s head and a three-strand monkey’s fist. Using either ornamental knot, make up a heaving line.
    5. Engines: Perform routine maintenance on your ship’s propulsion system, including filter, spark plug, oil changes, proper fueling procedures and other routine maintenance tasks. Refer to operations manuals or your ship’s adult leaders for correct procedures and guidance.
    6. USPS: Join a local Power Squadron as an Apprentice member.
    7. Boatswain Call: Demonstrate your ability to use a boatswain’s pipe by making the following calls—word to be passed, boat call, veer, all hands, pipe down, and piping the side.
    8. U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary: Successfully complete either the Coast GuardAuxiliary Boating Skills and Seamanship or Sailing Skills and Seamanship course. All core sessions, as well as at least three elective sessions, must be completed to fulfill this requirement.

Source:  Sea Scout Manual, 11th Edition, 2012 printing

sea scout-ableAble

  1. Ideals
    1. Organize and conduct two impressive opening and closing ceremonies for your ship.
    2. Submit an essay of 500 to 1,000 words on how our nation’s maritime history has contributed to our way of life.
  2. Active Membership
    1. Attend at least 75 percent of your ship’s meetings and special activities for one year.  Note: Check with your ship’s yeoman.
    2. Prepare and present a program on Sea Scouts for a Boy Scout troop, Venturing crew, Venturing Officers’ Association meeting, school class, or other youth group. Your presentation should last a minimum of 15 minutes and describe the activities of your ship and Sea Scouts.
  3. Leadership 
    Either serve and fulfill the responsibilities of a crew leader or an elected officer of your ship, or serve as an activity chair for two major ship events. Responsibilities should include planning, directing, and evaluating the event. (These events are in addition to the Ordinary requirement.)
  4. Swimming
    Pass all requirements for the BSA’s Lifesaving merit badge.
  5. Safety
    1. Develop and use a customized vessel safety checklist for a boat used by your ship.
    2. Demonstrate your understanding of fire prevention on vessels.
    3. Know the classes of fires and the substances that will extinguish each type of fire.
    4. In a safe place, under adult supervision, demonstrate your ability to successfully extinguish a class A and a class B fire with an approved fire extinguisher. See that the fire extinguisher used is properly recharged or replaced.
    5. Conduct a fire safety inspection of the vessel normally used by your ship or of your ship’s meeting place. Note any fire hazards and report them to your ship’s adult leaders.
    6. Complete the American Red Cross Standard First Aid course.
    7. Obtain CPR certification from a certified agency.
    8. Demonstrate the Heimlich maneuver and tell when it is used.
  6. Marlinspike Seamanship
    1. Complete a back splice, eye splice, short splice, long splice, and a palm-and needle whipping.
    2. Sew a flat seam, round seam, and grommet eye in canvas or sail material. Describe how each is used in construction of and the care of sails.
    3. Describe the parts of a block and explain how blocks are sized. Describe the following types of tackle: luff, gun, double purchase, single whip, and runner. With the help of another shipmate, reeve a double purchase tackle.
  7. Boat Handling
    1. Demonstrate your ability to properly operate a small boat equipped with a motor. Included should be fueling, starting, leaving a dock, maneuvering, and coming alongside.
    2. Know the names and functions of lines used to secure a vessel to a wharf or pier. Understand and execute docking commands used in handling lines on your ship’s primary vessel.
  8. Anchoring
    1. Describe the various kinds of anchor rode and the advantages and disadvantages of each type.
    2. Identify the parts of the anchor cable starting with the anchor and ending at the vessel.
    3. Describe the methods of marking chain and demonstrate that you know the chain markings on your ship’s vessel.
    4. While on a cruise assist in the construction of an anchor watch schedule and stand one watch.
    5. Identify a capstan or windlass and explain its use in handling line, wire rope,or chain.
  9. Navigation Rules
    1. Demonstrate a working knowledge of Navigation Rules, International and Inland.
    2. Explain vessel lights for the following: towing (astern, alongside, pushing ahead, and cannot deviate), fishing, trawling, restricted maneuverability, underwater operations, constrained by draft, and aground.
    3. Describe special lights and day shapes deployed on the following vessels: not under command, restricted by ability to maneuver, constrained by draft, fishing (trawling), and sailing vessels under power.
    4. Understand the system of aids to navigation employed in your area. Include buoys, lights, and daymarks, and their significance and corresponding chart symbols.
    5. Read in detail a National Ocean Service (NOS) chart, preferably for the area normally cruised by your ship, identifying all marks on it.
    6. Explain the use of tide tables, current tables, light lists, and how to update a chart using the Notice to Mariners.
  10. Piloting and Navigation
    1. Describe the deck log kept aboard your ship’s principal craft. Keep a complete log for three cruises.
    2. Lay a course of at least three legs and execute it using dead reckoning.
    3. Demonstrate your ability to fix your position by the following methods: taking bearings from two known objects, running fix, and estimated position.
    4. Establish distance from a known object using “double the angle on the bow”and explain how to set a danger angle.
    5. Discuss how GPS (Global Positioning System) operates and the purpose of waypoints. While underway, demonstrate your ability to use a GPS using three different waypoints.
    6. Discuss the method of establishing a radar fix.
  11. Practical Deck Seamanship
    1. Demonstrate your knowledge of personal safety equipment needed while cleaning, maintaining, or repairing your vessel.
    2. Know the names, uses, sizes, and proper care of the common hand tools used by your ship.
    3. Identify and explain the use of the following: thimble, shackle, turnbuckle, pelican hook, and other ship’s hardware and fittings commonly used aboard your ship’s vessels. Describe how each is sized.
    4. Demonstrate proper surface and coating preparation, coating techniques, care of stored coatings, and cleaning of brushes and tools used to maintain surfaces on your ship’s vessel.
    5. Explain techniques used for the maintenance, protection, and repair of hulls and decks on your ship’s vessel.
  12. Environment
    1. Demonstrate your knowledge of local environmental laws related to the proper storage, disposal, and cleanup of maritime coating materials, fuels, and other environmentally sensitive materials.
    2. Discuss with an adult leader the dumping of garbage in the marine environment. Review the contents of the MARPOL placard and locate it aboard your ship’s vessels.
    3. Write a 500-word report on a marine endangered species (mammal, bird, fish,or reptile). The report should include a description of the species, its habitat,history, current population numbers, and current steps being employed to help its recovery.
  13. Cruising 
    Earn the Long Cruise badge.
  14. Electives—Do any three of the following.
    1. Sailing: While leading a crew of not less than two other persons, demonstrate your ability to sail a sloop or another suitable vessel correctly and safely over a triangular course (leeward, windward, reaching marks), demonstrating beating, reaching, running, and the proper commands.
    2. Vessels: Teach and lead a crew under oar using a boat pulling at least four oars single- or double-banked. Perform the following maneuvers: get underway, maneuver ahead and back, turn the boat in its own length, dock, and secure.
    3. Drill: Demonstrate your ability to give and execute commands in close-order drill.
    4. Engines:
      1. Understand the safe and proper procedures for the use of gasoline and diesel inboard engines, including fueling, pre-start checks, ventilation,starting, running, periodic checks while running, securing, postoperative checks, and keeping an engine log.
      2. Using the type of engine aboard the vessel you most frequently use, demonstrate your understanding of basic troubleshooting and the preventive maintenance schedule recommended by the manufacturer.
    5. Yacht Racing:
      1. Demonstrate your understanding of the shapes, flag hoists, gun, and horn signals used in yacht racing as well as a working knowledge of the racing rules of the International Sailing Federation.
      2. Serve as helmsman, with one or more additional crew members, of a sloop-rigged or other suitable boat with a spinnaker in a race sailed under ISAF racing rules.
    6. Maritime History: Know the highlights of maritime history from the earliest times to the present. Include the evolution of vessel construction and propulsion, important voyages of exploration and development, the origin of maritime traditions, and the achievements of notable maritime leaders in U.S. sea history.
    7. Ornamental Ropework: Demonstrate your ability to fashion the following items of ornamental ropework: four-strand Turk’s head, coach whipping, cockscombing, round braid, flat sennit braid, wall knot, and crown knot. Make a useful item such as a boatswain’s lanyard, rigging knife lanyard, bell rope, etc., or decorate a portion of your ship’s equipment such as a stanchion, rail, lifeline, tiller, etc.
    8. Fiberglass Repair and Maintenance: Demonstrate your proficiency and knowledge of fiberglass repair and gel coating while working on your ship’s vessel or other similar vessel.
    9. Specialty Proficiency: Become a certified scuba diver or become proficient in boardsailing, surfing, kayaking, or whitewater rafting/canoeing.
    10. USPS: As an apprentice member of the United States Power Squadrons complete the Seamanship and Piloting courses.
    11. U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary: Successfully complete the Coast Guard Auxiliary Weekend Navigator course.

Source:  Sea Scout Manual, 11th Edition, 2012 printing

Resource information for your Ship's operations.

 

 

Continuing training and education is vital to the success of your Sea Scout program.  BSA offers a wide variety of online and in-person training opportunities to fit your needs.

Sea Scouting had its beginning at a camp fire in England when Lord Baden-Powell voiced the hope that older Scouts would be interested in learning about boat management and seamanship. He stressed the need for young men to prepare themselves for service on their country's ships. (See also A Short History of Sea Scouting in the United Kingdom and the Early History of Sea Scouting.)

Following the campfire, there was activity in England that resulted in Lord Baden-Powell's older brother, Warington, writing a book called Sea Scouting and Seamanship for Boys. It was enthusiastically received by the young men of Britain and soon found its way to the United States.

Sea Scouting in America was founded in 1912. That year, Arthur A. Carey of Waltham, Massachusetts, had Sea Scouts using the schooner Pioneer and was appointed Chairman of the National Council Committee on Sea Scouting. That summer, Charles T. Longstreth organized a Sea Scout patrol on his yacht in Philadelphia. Both of these men prepared pamphlets on Sea Scouting and Carey's Cruising for Sea Scouts was the first literature related to Sea Scouting.

A booklet that preceded the first Sea Scout manual published in 1915 gave some direction to Sea Scouting. It was entitled Nautical Scouting and was compiled by Charles Longstreth.

Since its beginning, the Boy Scouts of America had been aware of the need for an older-boy program. Mr. Carey made the first real effort to satisfy that need when he helped promote Sea Scouting with his pamphlet.

In a report to the National Executive Board, Mr. Carey recommended that Sea Scouting be recognized as a special department of the Boy Scouts of America. He suggested that the pamphlet Cruising for Sea Scouts be accepted as a supplement to the Handbook for Boys until a more complete Sea Scout manual could be written.

From 1912 to 1917, Sea Scouting struggled through a difficult period. And yet, with little or no national guidance, it managed to grow.

In addition, G. V. L. Meyer, Secretary of the Navy, in February 1913, encouraged the development of Sea Scouting and extended the cooperation of the Navy Department. This was the beginning of a fruitful period of cooperation for Sea Scouting with the nation's armed services.

Sea Scouting received a real boost in October 1917, when James Austin Wilder (a veteran sailor, global traveler, artist, and devoted Boy Scout volunteer) was secured as Director of the Department of Sea Scouting of the Boy Scouts of America. For several years, as a volunteer, Mr. Wilder worked full time for Sea Scouting with the title of Chief Sea Scout.

He organized the scattered Sea Scout units info a national organization that generated the first wide-spread interest in Sea Scouting. Gathering all of the experience and scattered bits of literature used in the program, Mr. Wilder supervised the preparation of the first Sea Scout Manual in 1919. In those days, Sea Scouting followed a pattern of action that was very similar to that of a Boy Scout troop; for example: boys wore khaki uniforms. In order to register, they had to subscribe to the Scout Oath and law and pass the Tenderfoot requirements. Membership required that a boy be 15 years of age and weigh at least 112 pounds. (See also James Austin Wilder.)

For many years the Sea Scout program was aimed at older boys who had graduated from Boy Scout troops. Sea Scout units began to be called ships. The age-old organization of skippers, mates, boatswains, coxswains and crews began to be used.

On July 15, 1920, the well-illustrated fourth edition of the Sea Scout Manual was printed and sold in large quantities. Then came a period of 2 or 3 years in which Sea Scouting struggled to be recognized and understood. Although membership fell off, the program proved healthy enough to withstand this period of adjustment. Finally it began to grow as more councils gave it enthusiastic support.


Over the years, one of the persons most responsible for the development of Sea Scouting was Commander Thomas J. Keane. Between 1922 and 1925, he completely revised the Sea Scout program. He wrote the new requirements for advancement and changed the Boy Scout nature of Sea Scout uniforms into the seagoing uniform that Sea Scouts still wear today. As a result of his fine leadership, the Sea Scout Manual was almost completely revised. Under his direction, it was published in 1924.

Commander Keane served as acting director of the Sea Scout department in the national office from 1923 until January 15, 1927. His annual report of 1925 indicates that there were 85 registered Sea Scout ships. A similar report in 1926 revealed an increase of 38 ships for a total of 123 ships.

In 1927, Commander Keane was appointed the national director of Sea Scouting, its first full-time professional director. One of T.J. Keane's earliest project was organizing the first Antarctic expedition to include a Scout. The Scout, Eagle Scout and Able Sea Scout Paul Siple of Erie Pennsylvania, ably participated in Admiral Robert Byrd's expedition of 1928-29. In the years the followed, Siple built a career on Antarctic exploration and extreme cold weather climatology. (See also Eagle Scout Siple with Admiral Byrd in the Antarctic.)

In the years that followed, there was a marked increase in the number of units and boys registered in Sea Scouting. By 1930 the membership had reached 8,043 young men. In the 1930's, with the cooperation of other departments in the national office of the Boy Scouts of America, he developed training courses for leaders, new registration procedures, and more acceptable Sea Scout equipment and uniforms. He also developed a National Sea Scout flagship competition in 1928 which has been in use in varying forms up to today. Click here to view a historical listing of National and Regional flagships.

A major revision of the manual was made in 1939 by the national committee. The new version was written by Carl D. Lane, an outstanding skipper and author of many books and articles about small ships and the sea.

With a membership of more than 27,000, Sea Scouting served its country well in World War II. Commander Keane was recalled to active service in the Navy and resigned his position as national director of Sea Scouting.

Thousands upon thousands of former and active Sea Scouts joined the Navy and made a tremendous impression on Admiral Chester Nimitz, who sincerely believed that Sea Scouts were better trained and better equipped to help the Navy win out over the enemy and the elements.

Throughout the rest of the 1940's, Sea Scouting continued to serve the boys of America who were interested in the lore of the sea. Sea Scouts all over the nation participated in flood relief and community service. They were in evidence at national jamborees. Sea Scout ships across the country held competitive events known as rendezvous and regattas.

Based on the written report of ship activities-the ship log - a national committee selected the ship with the most outstanding record to be the national flagship. Quite surprisingly, two years this honor was achieved by a Sea Scout ship located in the rather arid state of Kansas. Its Skipper was Dr. William C. Menninger, one of the early greats in Sea Scouting.

In May 1949, the National Executive Board made sweeping changes in the older-boy program, as a result of a study made by the Research Service of the Boy Scouts of America. This revision of Senior Scouting recognized as Explorers all young men who were 14 years of age or older and registered with the Boy Scouts of America.

So, on September 1, 1949, the Sea Scouts officially became Sea Explorers. This was primarily a change in terminology since the old Sea Scout program continued much the same is it had in the past.

In 1954, the National Executive Board of the Boy Scouts of America authorized the Research Institute for Social Service of the University of Michigan to make a national study of adolescent boys. This survey revealed the needs, desires, and concerns of 14- to 16- year old boys across the nation. As a result, a completely new Explorer program was developed and put into effect on January 1, 1959. However, this did not bring about a change in Sea Exploring. It was decided that changes should be postponed until there had been sufficient time to observe Sea Exploring in operation alongside the new Explorer program. After 5 years, in which there was ample time to make such observations, the decision was made to revise the program.

The national committee on Exploring worked closely with the Exploring Division in making recommendations for this revision. Groups of experienced volunteers also assisted- especially in the revision of advancement requirements. The object was to make available to Sea Exploring some of the elements of the new Explorer program that had been found effective, while preserving the integrity of Sea Scouting with its traditions.

After extensive field testing, the Exploring Division put the revised Sea Exploring program into effect. This was done in May 1966 with a new edition titled Sea Exploring Manual, written by Arthur N. Lindgren.

In 1968, a new Exploring Division, BSA was organized and established under the direction of John M. Claerhout, who placed a new emphasis on Sea Exploring by naming William J. Lidderdale as the first time director of Sea Scouting since 1935.

Afterwards, a new National Sea Exploring Committee was formed with Morgan F. Fitch, Jr., as Chair, to give new national volunteer emphasis to the promotion and support of Sea Exploring. In response to field reaction, the new Handbook for Skippers was written by Arthur Lindgren and published in 1971 for Skippers, mates, ship committee members, and other related adult leaders. The following year, Sea Exploring (along with all other phases of Exploring) officially became coed.

In 1974, the U.S. Navy assigned a liaison officer to work in the BSA national office. A series of officers served in this capacity through 1983. Their work further enriched and expanded Sea Exploring.

Sea Scouts across America were saddened by the death of Commander Thomas J. Keane in 1984. His pioneering efforts on behalf of Sea Scouting extended over sixty years. The rich tradition and long tenure of many Sea Scout Ships are a tribute to his career.

Technological improvements in seamanship, extensive changes in aids to navigation, and program improvements created the need for a new Sea Exploring Manual in the early 1980's. Long-time Sea Exploring leader, Bill Minto of Houston, Texas, did most of the text revision with the help of Don Callenius and Bob Maxfield, former national directors of Exploring, and Mike Strain of San Francisco. A number of BSA Skippers, U.S. Coast Guard personnel, and maritime experts contributed to this revision.

In 1998, the Boy Scouts of America reorganized the Exploring program into the Learning for Life Exploring program and the new Venturing Division. Sea Exploring was placed in the Venturing Division and was renamed Sea Scouts.

The 10th edition of the Sea Scout Manual, edited by Bruce Johnson and Jimmie Homburg, was published in 2000, which extensively revised the content and organization of the handbook, as well as updating advancement and uniforming standards.

In 2002, the Sea Scout Support Committee re-initiated the national Sea Scout sailing championships. The new competition, called the William I. Koch International Sea Scout Cup, is named for William Koch, famous yachtsman and National Committee member, whose generous support has made the competition possible. The Koch Cup competition includes Sea Scout competitors from all over the United States, as well as international Sea Scout participants. The initial running of the Koch Cup is scheduled to run in August of 2002 at the Columbia Yacht Club in Chicago, Illinois.

The National Sea Scout Support Committee provides program, strategic planning, membership development and marketing support services to the Sea Scout program.

Welcome to the adventure that is Sea Scouts, a coed program for young adults 14 - 20 years old (or 13 and completed 8th grade) and their adult advisors! This page provides information about getting involved in Scouting's best kept secret!

SSJTE

Scouting's Journey to Excellence

"Scouting's Journey to Excellence" is the BSA's new council performance recognition program designed to encourage and reward success and measure the performance of our units, districts, and councils. It is replacing the Centennial Quality Awards Program as a means of encouraging excellence in providing a quality program at all levels of the BSA.

 Scorecards    Support Information
 
 
 
   Power Point Slide Deck - Ship

For additional information about the Journey to Excellence program, including scorecards and support information for Packs, Troops, Teams, and Crews, please visit BSA's Journey to Excellence web site.